Tuesday, July 29, 2014

putthatazztowork:

Strength Training for Women: Lift Weights for the Body You Want

Every single woman should lift weights. Yes, every one of them. I don’t care if you’re 14 or 72, you can still benefit from strength training.

The media has condemned strength training for women for years, saying that lifting heavy weights will make you appear “bulky” or manly, and that is 100% false. Some women seem to think that a dumbbell heavier than 5 pounds will give them magical giant biceps that appear overnight. I’ve heard so many celebrity fitness trainers perpetuate this myth and say that women are better off lifting really light weight for more repetitions to “tone” their muscles. First of all, the word “tone” does not mean anything. Our muscles either grow (hypertrophy) or deteriorate (atrophy). We can lose body fat to make those muscle more apparent, but we can’t “tone.” Lifting light weights for a lot of repetitions will not make you stronger or more toned, so you are effectively wasting your time. There, I said it. If you want to make the most out of your time in the gym, you need to lift heavier weights. Our bodies need toadapt to a stimulus. If we are doing the same exercise everyday (i.e. going on the elliptical for 30 minutes, and then doing 15 minutes of crunches and light dumbbell exercises), our bodies will never adapt.

I can promise you that in my two years of strength training so far, I have never been mistaken for a man!

Now that that’s out of the way, strength training has tremendous benefits, specifically for women, who already have less muscle mass than men.

Those with more muscle mass burn more energy (calories) at rest. Yes, you read that correctly. If you have more muscle, you can eat more, because your body simply needs more calories to sustain this extra muscle tissue. “Each day, your body uses more than 35 calories to maintain each pound of muscle, while only 2 calories are needed to sustain a pound of fat (Westcott and Baechle 1998).”

Not only will you burn more calories in the course of the day, it has been proven in several studies (see sources below) that individuals with a higher lean body mass live longer, healthier lives. Strength training obviously makes your muscles stronger, but many fail to realize that lifting weights also strengthens our bones, tendons and our ligaments. If you want to avoid degeneration of your bones (osteoporosis) and connective tissue injuries later in life, strength training is extremely important. “Osteoporosis is partially preventable with adequate amounts of calcium in the diet, along with progressive high-intensity resistance training (Graves and Franklin 2001).” For women who are pre or postmenopausal, strength training is especially important to prevent further loss of muscle tissue.

In addition to the physiological benefits, there are many psychological benefits. Personally, I’ve proved to myself that I am capable of so much more than I realized. I recently set a deadlift personal record at 275 lbs (2 times my own bodyweight). I never would’ve dreamed of lifting that much weight. I know too many women who are unable to perform a push-up or a pull-up without assistance, which I believe are two movements everyone should be able to do.

Being a woman is not an excuse for being weak! Step out of your comfort zone and try something new. Make sure you have a friend with you who can make sure you are moving correctly. I promise you, you won’t regret it!

For more information, check out my blog and my Facebook page!

Check out my blog post on strength training for women :)

flextrovert:

Bro, do you even make an effort to stimulate myofibrillar hypertrophy by inducing skeletal muscle microtrauma?

Strength Training for Women: Lift Weights for the Body You Want

Every single woman should lift weights. Yes, every one of them. I don’t care if you’re 14 or 72, you can still benefit from strength training.

The media has condemned strength training for women for years, saying that lifting heavy weights will make you appear “bulky” or manly, and that is 100% false. Some women seem to think that a dumbbell heavier than 5 pounds will give them magical giant biceps that appear overnight. I’ve heard so many celebrity fitness trainers perpetuate this myth and say that women are better off lifting really light weight for more repetitions to “tone” their muscles. First of all, the word “tone” does not mean anything. Our muscles either grow (hypertrophy) or deteriorate (atrophy). We can lose body fat to make those muscle more apparent, but we can’t “tone.” Lifting light weights for a lot of repetitions will not make you stronger or more toned, so you are effectively wasting your time. There, I said it. If you want to make the most out of your time in the gym, you need to lift heavier weights. Our bodies need toadapt to a stimulus. If we are doing the same exercise everyday (i.e. going on the elliptical for 30 minutes, and then doing 15 minutes of crunches and light dumbbell exercises), our bodies will never adapt.

I can promise you that in my two years of strength training so far, I have never been mistaken for a man!

Now that that’s out of the way, strength training has tremendous benefits, specifically for women, who already have less muscle mass than men.

Those with more muscle mass burn more energy (calories) at rest. Yes, you read that correctly. If you have more muscle, you can eat more, because your body simply needs more calories to sustain this extra muscle tissue. “Each day, your body uses more than 35 calories to maintain each pound of muscle, while only 2 calories are needed to sustain a pound of fat (Westcott and Baechle 1998).”

Not only will you burn more calories in the course of the day, it has been proven in several studies (see sources below) that individuals with a higher lean body mass live longer, healthier lives. Strength training obviously makes your muscles stronger, but many fail to realize that lifting weights also strengthens our bones, tendons and our ligaments. If you want to avoid degeneration of your bones (osteoporosis) and connective tissue injuries later in life, strength training is extremely important. “Osteoporosis is partially preventable with adequate amounts of calcium in the diet, along with progressive high-intensity resistance training (Graves and Franklin 2001).” For women who are pre or postmenopausal, strength training is especially important to prevent further loss of muscle tissue.

In addition to the physiological benefits, there are many psychological benefits. Personally, I’ve proved to myself that I am capable of so much more than I realized. I recently set a deadlift personal record at 275 lbs (2 times my own bodyweight). I never would’ve dreamed of lifting that much weight. I know too many women who are unable to perform a push-up or a pull-up without assistance, which I believe are two movements everyone should be able to do.

Being a woman is not an excuse for being weak! Step out of your comfort zone and try something new. Make sure you have a friend with you who can make sure you are moving correctly. I promise you, you won’t regret it!

For more information, check out my blog and my Facebook page!

Monday, July 28, 2014
becomingathlete:

All smiles from our girl, @juliefoucher. #crossfitgames #teampurepharma

I’m in love

becomingathlete:

All smiles from our girl, @juliefoucher. #crossfitgames #teampurepharma

I’m in love

Anonymous said: well ive been researching for over 20 years and both my trainers for over 40 years. ass to grass is wrong. be careful of where you do your research, especially on the internet. there is a lot and i do mean A LOT of wrong info on nutrition and fitness. you can do what you want of course but if you start to feel any pain in the knee keep what i said in mind ok?

tobeshreddedasfuck:

I will :) I really appreciate your advice so thank you.

Yes, there is a lot of incorrect information in the fitness industry, evidently this Anon has spent the last 20 years reading all of it.

My knee has been bothering me for months.

I’m frustrated, because I feel like I always have something that’s bothering me. I’ve been ignoring my knee pain for a while, but it’s gotten worse. I’m gonna go see my physical therapist, and hopefully she can help. I pay so much attention to corrective exercise/prehab, and yet I still have so many issues. Sometimes I want to stop lifting, because I’m tired of being in pain. Fortunately I’ve never had a serious injury, but I don’t understand why I have constant aches and pains.

Went to the Bodies exhibit in NYC this weekend!

Went to the Bodies exhibit in NYC this weekend!

Reunited with my roomie! Good luck at PA school, girl!

Reunited with my roomie! Good luck at PA school, girl!

Sunday, July 27, 2014

"Isn’t it boring being on an all vegetable diet?"

veganprobs:

image

you tell me

porcedex

I just made the most bomb gluten free banana pancakes, but I ate them before I could take a picture…